A phenomenon in the Saiyasart is a process of change in which either cause, process or result are not within the perceptible range. If all three factors are perceptible, however, one speaks of an event.

Event and phenomenon

According to its logic, an event exists only if the three conditions of precondition, circumstances and occasion are perceptible. A phenomenon is again an event of which not all conditions are perceptible.

An event or phenomenon is a process of change that exists under extreme conditions. A process of change takes place simply through the simultaneous presence of existing beings within a sphere of existence, i.e. their existence in being.

Here the corresponding nature of the organic beings causes that the change is not equally visible due to its diversity. An extreme condition means that the change process is accelerating. Acceleration is the intensification of the presence of one or more beings, with possibly different concentrations within a sphere of existence.

The new constellation resulting from the process of change is caused only by a deliberate causation. This causing and the resulting constellation for the acceleration of the change process thus results in the extreme condition. Here the duration of the process is determined by the presence of extreme conditions. After completion, the change process will return to its normal course, with the transition point being referred to as its consequence.

The process of change under extreme conditions differs in two categories, between the perceptible or comprehensible process (event) and the opposite imperceptible (phenomenon) but still existing process.

The phenomenon

A priest walks over glowing charcoal without burning his feet. The state of visible charcoal, as a result, causes a combustion with the organic essence in case of a touch. On the other hand, the priest was defined and accepted as a special personality, and the belief in his extraordinary abilities was not called into question. Furthermore, one’s own ignorance of the actual course of events leads to the event being regarded as a phenomenon.

If one sees the event with the consciousness of the priest only as a human being, one will find in the detailed examination of the events that the combustion would not only be based on the temperature at which the foot would burn and depends on the glowing charcoal, but essentially the intensity of the action is decisive. If the priest were to walk or stand instead, his foot would immediately begin to burn.

The Saiyasart sees the phenomenon as a temporary grasp of events, although the knowledge regarding the logical explanation of the events is not yet known, but in no way attributable to a miracle.

What is a Phi Am?

Phi Am (ผีอํา) is a spirit being from Thai folklore, similar to a drude or a mare, as well as the medical term for sleep paralysis.

Background

Thais believe in a kind of ghost called Phi Am, which sits on a person’s chest at night and causes sleep paralysis. The term “Phi Am” is also used in medical parlance for sleep paralysis. It is said that these spirits can cause severe discomfort and even lead to suffocation death.

Phi Am allegedly prefer to terrorize men rather than women. To protect themselves from them, men often apply lipstick or put on women’s clothes before going to bed. The Thais try very hard to avoid the attention of the spirits, and sometimes the tendency to dress up as a woman is seen as an excuse for this. The exact origins of this belief are unknown, but it remains an important part of Thai culture.

Related Blog Posts


Saiyasart the twilight state

To the Glossarium

➔ Glossary

Search term


What is a Phi Dip Chin?

A Phi Dip Chin (ผีดิบจีน, also Phi Dued Luat, originally Jiangshi) is a hopping vampire or zombie from the Chinese tradition, who wears an ancient costume and has a Chinese rune in front of his face.

Background

The legend of Phi Dip Chin was brought to Thailand by the Thai-Chinese community. The Chinese originally called this undead being “Jiangshi”. This term is composed from the Chinese characters for “stiff” and “corpse”. The Phi Dip Chin are often described as revived corpses that resemble European vampires, but move hopping while stretching their arms away. In Thailand, the term “Jiangshi” is sometimes used colloquially for zombies in general.

Phi Dip Chin are usually depicted with clothing from the Qing Dynasty (1644-1912 AD) and are said to be able to absorb the life force (Qi) of living beings through touch. Phi Dip Chin are a kind of vampire-like creature. Phi Dip Chin kill creatures at night to absorb their qi or “life force” During the day they rest in coffins or hide in dark places. The reason for their unusual way of moving is that their corpse rigidity has progressed so far that they can only move around hopping. In fact, this points to the actual origin of this vampire myth.


YouTube

Mit dem Laden des Videos akzeptieren Sie die Datenschutzerklärung von YouTube.
Mehr erfahren

Video laden


The Jiangshi legend could go back to the Chinese tradition of Xiangxi gan shi ((湘西趕屍 / 湘西赶尸, Xiāngxī gǎn shī – “traveling corpses in Xiangxi”), in which corpse collectors or relatives track down deceased relatives who died far from home and bring them back to their homeland. In this custom, the corpses are erected and wrapped in shrouds.

Two strong, elastic bamboo poles were put under the armpits of the corpses so that they were secured and could be transported by two carriers. The journey was sometimes long, and due to the elasticity of the bamboo poles and the heaviness of the corpse, it was not uncommon for the poles and corpse to bounce up and down during transport. This may have given outsiders the impression that the body is hopping.

Related Blog Posts


To the Glossarium

➔ Glossary

Search term


What is a Phi Hua Khat?

Phi Hua Khat (ผีหัวขาด) is an accident ghost without a head in Thai folklore.

Background

It is said that if a person dies an unnatural and sudden death and is beheaded in the process, a Phi Hua Khat can arise. Phi Hua Khat are evil ghosts filled with anger and bitterness, which is why they are considered extremely dangerous in Thailand.

It is believed that the origin of this myth dates back to a time when (war) prisoners were beheaded with a sword (daab). It was feared that the headless spirit of the executed man would haunt the nearest village and terrorize its inhabitants.

In order to avoid the creation of a Phi Hua Khat, elaborate execution ceremonies were carried out, in which the condemned person was tied to a wooden pole sitting or kneeling. His head was fixed in such a way that the neck was exposed and stretched forward.

In order to carry out the execution, a sword fighting teacher trained in Saiyasart (see DAAB) was summoned. He then performed a ritual sword dance (Ram Daab) at the end of which the head of the condemned man was severed with a sword blow.

For many centuries, this method was considered one of the few ways to truly ensure that the spirit of the executed person was properly sent to the afterlife and could not cause any harm in this world.

Related Blog Posts


Saiyasart the girl by the wayside ALT

To the Glossarium

➔ Glossary

Search term


What is a Phi Ka?

In Thai folklore, a Phi Ka (ผีกะ) is a parasitic spirit that mainly affects women.

Background

Phi Ka are considered vicious, voracious spirits that reside in the bodies of women. They are known to be prone to violence and attack people.

The only known treatment for Phi Ka is to feed the host raw eggs, as the creature does not like them. Since the Phi Ka can fight back and retaliate, this can be a complicated and dangerous operation. However, it is said to be the only effective technique to remove these dangerous spirits from human hosts.

Phi Ka in the understanding of Saiyasart

From the point of view of Saiyasart , Phi Ka phenomena are most likely an occupation that can be eliminated by an expertly performed exorcism. The forcible instillation of raw eggs into the patient is, in the understanding of Saiyasart, only one of many possibilities for reprogramming the autodynamic system (see model of autodynamics).

Related Blog Posts


To the Glossarium

➔ Glossary

Search term


What is a Phi Kong Koi?

A Phi Kong Koi (ผีกองกอย, also called Kong Koi) is a one-legged forest vampire or jungle spirit from Thai or Lao folklore.

Background

According to legends, Phi Kong Koi is supposed to move on one leg hopping and make a sound like “Koi, koi, koi” or “Kong Koi”.

The creature is said to be quite ugly and not be able to climb trees. There are different statements about the exact appearance of the creature: some say it has a fly-like tube mouth, others think it looks more like a monkey or a langur.

However, most reports agree that the Phi Kong Koi sucks the blood from people’s toes. To protect themselves, travelers are advised to cover their feet, keep their feet closed, or cross their legs when sleeping in the jungle.


YouTube

Mit dem Laden des Videos akzeptieren Sie die Datenschutzerklärung von YouTube.
Mehr erfahren

Video laden

Related Blog Posts


To the Glossarium

➔ Glossary

Search term


What is a Phi Krahang?

Phi Krahang (กระหัง) is a ghost from Thai folklore who is often depicted with two large kradong (กระด้ง, round baskets for threshing rice) on his arms. He uses these baskets to fly through the rural areas of Thailand at night. He also often rides on a Sak Tam Khao (สากตําข้าว), a long wooden pestle of a traditional manual rice mortar.

Background

It is sometimes believed that the Phi Krahang is the husband of Phi Krasue or is related to Phi Pop (ผีปอบ). Others claim that Phi Krahang originated from men who have practiced too much Saiyasart (note: we can’t confirm that!). Supposedly, the Phi Krahang eats these men from the inside to form its ghost form.

Related Blog Posts


To the Glossarium

➔ Glossary

Search term


What is Phi Krasue?

Phi Krasue (ผีกระสือ) is a spirit from Thai folklore, usually depicted as a female head whose intestines partially hang down and are often covered by a dress.

Background

Phi Krasue is a feared ghost in Thailand, Laos, Cambodia and Malaysia. The Phi Krasue is said to take the form of a beautiful woman in a long, flowing dress and is known for captivating his victims. These ghosts are also part of the Laotian, Cambodian and Malay faiths, seeking out pregnant women either immediately before or shortly after giving birth. The ghost then tries to penetrate them with its long tongue to consume the fetus or placenta.

Phi krasue By Xavier Romero Frias Own work based on ผี Thai ghosts CC BY SA 3.0

Phi krasue By Xavier Romero Frias Own work based on ผี Thai ghosts CC BY SA 3.0

It can be assumed that the depiction of Phi Krasue goes back to hanged women whose lower bodies were eaten by animals.

Related Blog Posts


To the Glossarium

➔ Glossary

Search term


What is a Phi Lang Kluang?

A Phi Lang Kluang (ผีหลังกลวง, spirit with a hollow back) is a spirit creature from (southern) Thai folklore.

Background

It is said that Phi Lang Kluang has a very large wound on his back. Inside the hollow back there are intestines full of worms.

According to legends, Phi Lang Kluang enjoys harmless jokes and pranks. For example, they ask someone to scratch their back. When someone does this, the Phi Lang Kluang turns out to be such a creature with a hollow back and full of creeping centipedes.

Phi Lang Kluang are said to live in forest communities. This and the appearance in a Chinese text (Shan Hai Ching) about native forest dwellers with funnel breasts suggest that the story is more of a denigration of minorities at its core.

Related Blog Posts


To the Glossarium

➔ Glossary

Search term


What is a Phi Ma Bong?

A Phi Ma Bong (ผีม้าบ้อง) is a spirit creature of northern Thai folklore, similar to a centaur.

Background

A Phi Ma Bong is a spirit from northern Thailand that resembles a tikbalang, a kelpie or a centaur. This spirit is usually depicted as a ghost horse or as a demonic shapeshifter. Phi Ma Bong is often described as a giant black horse with red eyes who is said to have the ability to transform into a beautiful woman.

Supposedly, Phi Ma Bong haunts lonely roads and paths to lure careless travelers into the forest and kill them. In some stories, the Phi Ma Bong is said to be able to take the form of various animals.

Related Blog Posts


To the Glossarium

➔ Glossary

Search term